Charter Schools: What You Need to Know

by Tanya Anton | GoMamaGuide.com [Updated from a previous version.]

Now that it’s Charter Season, we want you to be prepared. In this article we’ll cover some basics and a few specifics you should know about charter schools.Charter Draft

First, it bears repeating that California is at the forefront of the charter movement with more students enrolled in charter schools here than anywhere else in the country. There are 23,000 101,060* 199,863* students enrolled in charter schools in Los Angeles County alone, and 49,840* on waitlists. Nearly 1 in every 4 students within LAUSD attend charters, and that number is growing every year.

*updated for the 2016 school year according to CCSA.org  

Charters are tuition-free semi-independent, somewhat autonomous schools operating with public funds, authorized by either the local school district, the county, or the state board of ed. Charters get their name from the lengthy legal document that outlines the many facets of the operation of their charter school – from the vision to curriculum to staffing to governance to fiscal, academic and campus procedures.

Some charters are chains of schools replicated on multiple sites run by large charter management organizations (CMOs), and others are small individual school start-ups launched by an ad-hoc group of parents, educators, visionaries and entrepreneurs with a shared vision of providing an alternative model of education.

All charters in California have to follow federal law, state ed codes, teach grade level content standards, and participate in standardized testing.

In Los Angeles There Are Two Types of Charters

Independent charters have the most autonomy to operate with full flexibility on staff hiring and firing (they don’t typically use the UTLA teachers contract so they are non-union), can make their own decisions in terms of budget, governance, overall school direction and operation, and are unaffected by district budget cuts or policy changes. Unless they are extremely well-endowed and can afford their own building, most independent charters apply for classroom space via Prop 39 and are given a minimum number of classrooms co-located on the side of another LAUSD neighborhood school campus. In recent years this process has been fraught with political infighting and less than transparent negotiations when it comes to which campuses have space, which do not, and which programs get offered which space. The current school board climate has been at times downright hostile to charters, thus severely limiting their ability to operate and serve students, let alone grow to accommodate their waitlists. Highly sought-after charters can sometimes have wait lists in the hundreds each year. 

The other type of charter is the affiliated conversion charter – schools that were a traditional neighborhood school that “went charter” after 51% or more of the staff voted to convert to charter status. More of a hybrid, these charters have some autonomy on teaching, curriculum and textbooks, some budgetary flexibility with monies they get directly from the state, but are bound by UTLA/LAUSD policy on things like teacher contracts (must hire UTLA teachers therefore subject to seniority and bumping rights), and are affected by district decisions such as class size increases, calendar changes, or lateral reductions in specific staff positions and programs. Think of them as a neighborhood school with some autonomy perks. Affiliated charters may have less autonomy than the independent charter, but more importantly they get to keep their facility (building), and must give enrollment priority to those who reside within the neighborhood attendance area. So the only way to assure enrollment, is to reside within the footprint. Many conversion charters are so full of neighborhood kids that few remaining seats ever go up for lottery, and if they do, hundreds of students may apply for them and be waitlisted.

In terms of applying to charters, anyone from any district may apply, and you may apply to as many charters as you like. Enrollment for independent charters is drawn by public lottery, which you can be present for or not. Independent charters give priority enrollment to founding families if it’s a start-up, staff members, and usually siblings of current students. Some charters will also give priority to those who reside within the local school district (LAUSD), a specific nearby school attendance zone, or to those who qualify for the Free/Reduced Lunch program. Affiliated charters must give priority to residents first, then non-residents. Each charter application process and lottery is overseen and run independently by each school site.

Built-in Academic Accountability

Unlike a neighborhood school that can fail year after year and nothing is done about it, charter schools face a renewal process every 4-5 years where in order to continue to stay open they are reviewed and voted on by their authorizing board. They MUST meet state requirements or they can be in jeopardy of being shut down. This can, and has happened to some charter schools.

Many charters (but not all) have had excellent academic results. Some are able to offer smaller class sizes, and a smaller overall student body size which can lead to greater individual attention and student success. Some offer alternative models of education that might fit better for some children than the traditional district model. However, sometimes due to space constraints this is at the expense of other “peripheral programs” or enrichments, such as visual or performing arts, an instrumental music program, PE or sports or outdoor green space, or a dedicated lunchroom or cafeteria, or even a library.

Not all charters outperform neighborhood schools. In fact, most recent numbers show that charters, on average, aren’t performing that much better than district schools. Some are, some aren’t. It really depends on the school.

Charters Offer Alternatives to the Traditional District Model
One thing charter schools do offer is a panoply of educational options, ranging from strictly college-prep academic, to crunchy-granola progressive schools, to language immersions, to STEM-focused (science, tech, engineering, math), to developmental project-based co-constuctivist leanings, to pumped-up traditional schools whose only difference to the garden-variety district model is a nicer demeanor, more enrichments and curricular flexibility. But there are plenty of choices. If the traditional neighborhood school is not meeting the needs of your child, there’s a whole range of charter schools out there to explore.

Prop 39 Co-Locations
Charter schools apply for District space every year via Prop 39 which requires districts to provide classroom space to charter schools. Due to space limitations, many charters are co-located on the side of another district school campus, housed in a set of temporary bungalows, or a side wing of another campus. Sometimes they share facilities, and sometimes charter schools opt for private space and set up in a church, a business park, or even a strip mall. Accordingly, the space limitations can be less than ideal. There might not be a library, or sports field for PE and recess, or an auditorium for assemblies, performances, or graduation, or even a dedicated lunchroom or cafeteria. Sometimes having a (non-union/non-district) charter on the same campus as a traditional district-union school can cause friction and a literal turf war. Sometimes co-locations can work in a collaborative way, but many times (especially of late) the schools like siblings, fight and campaign against each other, politically-speaking, pitting families against one another.

Still, charters are not going away and they provide much-needed options where district schools have failed kids. And, many of them are extremely successful. And, despite allegations otherwise, most LA charters are not-for-profit.

What makes a charter great? Could be an innovative teaching model, collaborative learning, special partnerships, flexible learning environment, enthusiastic teachers, motivated students and a great community of like-minded families. No two charter schools are alike. One must really do one’s research, tour and apply directly at each school site you’re interested in, as there is no one-stop centralized application process that covers all your charter options.

Charter Highlights:
-Can apply to as many as you like
-Apply directly at each school site
-Each school site maintains its own lottery and timeline/deadlines
-Some make you attend a mandatory open house/tour before you can apply
-Some allow you to apply online site unseen
-Conversion charters give priority to residents within the attendance area
-Each charter has its own lottery priorities: founding families, staff, siblings (sometimes)
-Some also give a priority to LAUSD residents, if you qualify for Free/Reduced Lunch program (Title 1), or come from a certain feeder school
-Charters means commuting (no transportation provided)
-No accumulating wait list or points
-Must reapply yearly if you don’t get in

What are the charters in your area? Please consult my color-coded maps on the school finder page of my website. Charters are marked in green.

Or book a consultation with me and together we’ll go over all your charter options.
In-personPhone.

Or check out the California Charter Schools Assoc for more info.

Want to use this article? You can as long as long as you include this complete blurb with it:
 
Tanya Anton is the creator of GoMamaGuide.com helping parents demystify and navigate their public school options in Los Angeles. To read more articles by Tanya or to learn about her Guidebooks, House Chats, Consultations, and Seminars, visit GoMamaGuide.com or email us at GoMama@mac.com.
© 2017 by Tanya Anton, GoMamaGuide.com All Rights Reserved. 
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2016 Charter Deadlines Are Happening!

Charter SchlsHey folks, it’s Charter Season, meaning if you’re looking for charter school options for the Fall of 2016-17, NOW is the time to get those applications in!

Each charter school is responsible for running their own admissions process and application timeline, so be sure to check with the charter schools you are interested in to get all the specific details. If you applied and were waitlisted last year, you need to apply again this year. (Luckily there are no points to worry about!)

To make things easy for you, I have compiled a list of some of the more asked about charters. This is by no means an exhaustive list but it’s a good place to start. Use my maps. And as I always recommend:

Tour.  Ask Questions.  Apply.  Repeat.

Most charters give preference to siblings of existing students*, and many charters offer other priorities such as to founding families or staff members, students residing within LAUSD or even a specific LAUSD school attendance area, or students who qualify for the Free/Reduced Meal Plan. To be sure, read the fine print on the application.

* LAUSD has recently removed the sibling preference from the boilerplate charter language that must be included in all Affiliated Conversion renewals.

To learn more about what a charter school is, go HERE.
To learn more about affiliated conversion charters, go HERE.
To peruse my color-coded school finder maps, go HERE. (Charters are in green.)

OK. OK already. Here are the Lists.
(Remember these are by no means exhaustive. Do your research!)

Charter Elementary Schools
Charter Middle Schools

2016 Charter Deadlines – Elementary Schools

2016 Charter Deadlines – Elementary Schools

Not an exhaustive list. Please view my school finder maps.
All schools grades K-5 unless otherwise noted.

West:
Citizens of the World Charter/Mar Vista (TK-5) – apps/apply online, deadline Feb 22 5p, lottery Mar 7 6p
MV tours: Feb 17 6:30p
www.cwcmarvista.org

Goethe — apps avail online, deadline Mar 25 4:30p, lottery Apr 5 6p
tours: Feb 11, 18, Mar 1, 10
www.goethecharterschool.org

Ocean Charter School (TK-8) — apps closed, deadline Jan 29, lottery Feb 24 10a @MV Campus
ongoing info tours
www.oceancharterschool.org

WISH (TK-8) —  call school for more lottery info
tours: EL: Feb 10, Mar 9
www.wishcharter.org

Canyon Charter – priority given to residents, remaining seats up for lottery
apps avail now in each office, deadline Mar 14 12p, lottery Mar 18 8:30a
http://www.canyoncharter.com/resources/files/Canyon_Lottery2016.pdf

Kenter Canyon – priority given to residents, remaining seats up for lottery
Apps avail online or apply in person beginning Feb 16, deadline Apr 8 12p, Lottery Apr 22 8:30a
http://kentercanyon.org/lottery-information/

Marquez Charter – priority given to residents, remaining seats up for lottery
for lottery info, tour dates and to RSVP call 310-454-4019
http://marquezcharter.org/registration

Palisades Charter – priority given to residents, remaining seats up for lottery
tours: Feb 9, Mar 1, Apr 5, Jun 6 8:45a – call school for deadlines
palielementary.org/lottery.php

Topanga Charter – priority given to residents, remaining seats up for lottery
Tours: Feb 4, 25 9a – call school for deadlines
www.topangaelementary.org/admissions.html

Westwood Charter – priority given to residents, remaining seats, if any, up for lottery
Apps avail Feb 8, deadline Apr 8, lottery Apr 29
www.westwoodcharter.org/lottery-information

Valley:
Chime Institute (K-8) — apps avail online now, deadline Mar 4 3p, lottery tbd
tours: Feb 3, 5, 12, 17, 29, Mar 6 9a
www.chimeinstitute.org

iLEAD Encino (formerly CalSTEAM) (TK-9) – apps avail on site, deadline Mar 11, lottery Mar 25
tours: Feb 3
ileadencino.org/prospective-families

Our Community School (K-8) —  apps avail online now, deadline for K: Mar 4, deadline for Gr 1-8: May 27
Lottery for K: Mar 11 11a, Gr 1-8: Jun 3 11a
tours: Feb 10, Mar 9, Apr 13, May 4 8a
ourcommunityschool.org

Valley Charter Schl (K-8) — apps avail online now, deadline Feb 5 4p, lottery Feb 19
tours: call 818.810.6713
elementary.valleycharterschool.org
 
Central:
Citizens of the World Charter/Hollywood – apps avail now, deadline Feb 24 5p, lottery Mar 9 6p
tours: Feb 4, 19 9a, , Feb 4 6:30p
cwchollywood.org

Larchmont Charter/Hwd/WeHo (TK-12) —  one application for all campuses
apps avail online now, deadline Feb 17 5p, lottery Feb 27 9a
tours: see website
larchmontcharter.org

East:
Citizens of the World Charter/Silver Lk (TK-6) – apps avail online now, deadline Mar 1 5p, lottery Mar 15 5:30p
tours: call
cwcsilverlake.org

Gabriela Charter (K-8) – apps avail online now, deadline Mar 3 6p, lottery Mar 17 6p
tours: call
gabriellacharterschool.org

Los Feliz Charter Schl Arts (TK-6) — apps avail online now, deadline Feb 24, lottery Mar 3 3p
tours: Feb 10, 18 9a full
www.losfelizarts.org

Other:
SMASH (K-8) — apps avail online, deadline Mar 18, lottery early April (priority given to Santa Monica residents)
tours: Mondays at 9a
www.smash.smmusd.org

— Be sure to check out my Middle Schools List too!

As always, if you are troubled, confused or need guidance, I am happy to help. Together we’ll go over all your charter options. In-personPhone.